Where are the CAG regulations?

We talk a lot about NHS Digital, and its data releases that continue to ignore opt-outs. But 4 years ago today, Royal Assent of the Care Act 2014 gave NHS Digital a “general duty” to “respect and promote the privacy of recipients of health services and of adult social care in England” – which clearly hasn’t been honoured in some areas of its work. The Act also changed the law specifically so that the Confidentiality Advisory Group (CAG) of the Health Research Authority has the power to advise NHS Digital; advice to which NHS Digital must listen.

Caldicott 3 itself does not require dissent to be honoured when data is disseminated in line with the ICO’s Code of Practice on Anonymisation. (The National Data Guardian – who has been given no enforcement powers – is very careful not to ‘cross wires’ with the UK’s data regulator, who does have such powers.) And, despite well over a million patients clearly indicating their wishes to the contrary, NHS Digital continues to argue its dissemination of pseudonymised data is “anonymised” to the satisfaction of the 1998 Data Protection Act.

The UK is about to get a new Data Protection Act, aligned with and based on the EU General Data Protection Regulation, which says:

(26) … Personal data which have undergone pseudonymisation, which could be attributed to a natural person by the use of additional information should be considered to be information on an identifiable natural person.

The UK’s Information Commissioner will update the Code of Practice on Anonymisation in due course –  she’s just a little busy right now, and the new Data Protection Act is not yet on the statute book – but the Irish Commissioner has already said: (emphasis added)

“Although pseudonymisation has many uses, it should be distinguished from anonymisation, as it only provides a limited protection for the identity of data subjects in many cases as it still allows identification using indirect means. Where a pseudonym is used, it is often possible to identify the data subject by analysing the underlying or related data.

Current practice will have to change.

While IGARD may be the appropriate body to advise whether a request meets NHS Digital’s standards for dissemination, it is not an appropriate body to advise on releasing data which does not honour patients’ objections. The adjudication of the principles of those decisions, by statute, belongs to CAG.

There are legitimate instances where patients’ dissent may be be overridden – but IGARD is not, and never should have been, the body to decide that.

The opt-out is there to protect patients who decide that the safeguard the NHS currently relies upon – pieces of paper, which include for example commercial re-use contracts with commercial companies that service other commercial companies, including pharmaceutical companies that use the data for promoting their products (i.e. marketing) to doctors – is not sufficient for their situation. As is their right.

Another example: in 2014, the Health Select Committee asked for a safe setting for researchers. Only in April 2018 did a remote safe setting begin to be piloted for researchers – that work not only needs to be completed, but it should become the standard means of access.

NHS Digital continues to insist that a piece of paper is sufficient safeguard under which to release copies of the entire nation’s lifelong, linked medical histories to hundreds of organisations. Its own published records show that two-thirds of NHS Digital’s data releases do not respect patient dissent.

It should be CAG which makes such decisions, whenever and wherever it is necessary. The CAG Regulations will make that clear, when they exist. Assurances to patients are less than meaningful when the Regulations to which they relate do not yet exist.

If someone applying for patients’ data cannot do what they need with only 98% of people’s data, they should simply explain to a responsible body why this is the case. Public Health England’s cancer registry already takes this approach with the choice of protections if offers for event dates. NHS Digital simply releases data on every patient, with the medical event dates completely unprotected.

The National Data Guardian was asked to determine a single choice by which patients could express their dissent from their data being used for purposes beyond their direct care. When that choice is disregarded, it must be on a basis clearly and specifically defined in statute, and approved by CAG.

As it is doing around the world, the introduction of the GDPR will force a change, and that change should protect patients’ data that under the new Data Protection Act will be considered identifiable. Those who still need everyone’s data will have to explain why to a competent body – which really isn’t too much to ask.

Given the clear promises given as a consequence of the care.data and HES data scandals – promises much repeated, but yet to be delivered – we’ve been waiting a long time for this to be fixed.

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  1. Pingback: medConfidential Bulletin, 18th May 2018 | williambowles.info

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